Footballing Icons ‘rename’ London’s Underground

Chinese developers invest to build replica of London’s Crystal Palace, a Victorian wonder

To celebrate 150 years of both, they’ve created a limited edition tube map, which swaps the 367 Tube, DLR and Overground station names for those of football greats. Players appear at stations relevant to their success Credit: London Underground/FA A number of the past and present footballers appear at stations with special relevance. Leytonstone marks the place of David Beckham’s birth, Arsenal is changed to the club’s England midfielder Jack Wilshere and Upton Park becomes 1966 World Cup-winning captain and West Ham United great, Bobby Moore. David Beckham lends his name to Leytonstone Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Each tube line represents a different footballing ‘category’ Credit: London Underground/FA Below are the stations with particular relevance to the given names: Denmark Hill – Peter Schmeichel, Former Danish international Highbury & Islington – Dennis Bergkamp, Arsenal legend New Cross Gate – Tim Cahill, Former Millwall favourite Norwood Junction – Attilio Lombardo, Former Crystal Palace favourite Crystal Palace – Mile Jedinak, Current Palace star Queen’s Park – Pavel Srnicek – Former QPR favourite Wembley Central – Eric Cantona, FA Cup Winner at Wembley North Wembley – Nicolas Anelka, FA Cup Winner at Wembley (and scored twice for France v England) Shepherd’s Bush -Rodney Marsh, QPR legend Lancaster Gate – Sir Bobby Charlton, England legend/Former FA Councillor Totttenham Court Road – Jimmy Greaves, Tottenham legend Liverpool Street – Ian Rush, Liverpool legend Leytonstone – David Beckham (place of birth) Newbury Park – Mick Channon Fulham Broadway – John Terry, Chelsea legend Putney Bridge – Tony Gale, Former Fulham favourite Wimbledon – Andy Thorn, Former Wimbledon favourite St. James’s Park – Joe Harvey, Newcastle legend West Ham – Billy Bonds, West Ham legend Upton Park – Bobby Moore, West Ham legend Watford – Graham Taylor, Former Watford manager Wembley Park – Sir Alf Ramsey, World Cup-Winning manager at Wembley Tooting Broadway – Alex Stepney, England goalkeeper started career at Tooting & Mitcham United South Wimbledon – Dave Beasant, Wimbledon legend Arsenal – Jack Wilshere, Current Arsenal star Finsbury Park – Theo Walcott, Current Arsenal star St. John’s Wood – Ian St. John Woolwich Arsenal – Eddie Hapgood, Arsenal Legend. Credit: London Underground/FA “Football and London Underground have always been closely linked – from the early days of the game, to jubilant fans travelling to and from Wembley on the Jubilee line and the hundreds of thousands that use the network to get to games every weekend today.” Phil Hufton, Chief Operating Officer of London Underground Credit: London Underground/FA Players capped more than 100 times are specially marked Credit: London Underground/FA Players who have been capped more than 100 times for England including Rachel Yankey, Peter Shilton and Steven Gerrard, are marked with special icons, as are England players with more than 40 goals, including FA150 ambassador Michael Owen and Gary Lineker. The map also singles out those who have won five or more FA Cups – such as Ashley Cole and pre-war players Jimmy Forrest and Charles Wollaston. It also includes symbols to show those who have been Knighted – Sir Geoff Hurst, Sir Trevor Brooking, Sir Walter Winterbottom and Sir Alf Ramsey – or are a Peer of the Realm, like Arthur Kinnaird. The map marks 150 years for the London Underground and the FA Credit: London Underground/FA “Creating this special version of such an iconic map is a fitting way for The FA and London Underground to mark its shared 150th anniversaries. With the map featuring so many greats from the history of the game, it is sure to generate huge debate amongst fans as well.” Alex Horne, General Secretary of The Football Association The map was collated by the Football Association’s historian David Barber. Early drafts were shared with notable football writers and commentators, with the aim being to create a list that truly celebrates a century and a half of the nation’s favourite game.

Players capped more than 100 times are specially marked

The cross-London scheme has already led to a number of exciting discoveries with the latest coming while workers were building a utility tunnel at the Liverpool Street station site. Working under the direction of Crossrail’s archaeologists, the construction workers carefully removed the human skulls and Roman pottery, found in the sediment of the historic channel of the River Walbrook. The skulls were found below the Bedlam burial ground established in the 16th century, where 3,000 skeletons will be carefully removed during major archaeological excavations next year. For safety reasons, the archaeologists have had to leave the archaeology work to the tunnellers as the skulls were up to six metres below ground. Roman skulls have been found along the historic Thames tributary the River Walbrook throughout London’s history. This led to speculation they were heads decapitated by Queen Boudicca’s rebels during the rebellion against Roman occupation in the 1st century AD. However, later archaeology suggested that the River Walbrook possibly eroded a Roman cemetery under Eldon Street in the Liverpool Street area and the skulls and other bones had been washed downstream. The latest skulls were located in clusters indicating they were caught in a bend in the river. The location of the skulls indicates they were washed out of the burial ground during Roman times. Lead archaeologist Jay Carver said: “This is an unexpected and fascinating discovery that reveals another piece in the jigsaw of London’s history. “This isn’t the first time that skulls have been found in the bed of the River Walbrook and many early historians suggested these people were killed during the Boudicca rebellion against the Romans.” He went on: “We now think the skulls are possibly from a known Roman burial ground about 50 metres up river from our Liverpool Street station work site. Their location in the Roman layer indicates they were possibly washed down river during the Roman period.” The tunnellers have also discovered wooden medieval structures believed to have been part of the walls of the Bedlam burial ground. The Museum of London Archaeology will analyse the finds over the coming months and hope to find out more about the age, sex and diet of the people associated with the Roman skulls.

London Archeologists Discover Roman Skulls On Crossrail Site

Britains Crystal Palace, the Victorian exhibition center that was once the largest glass structure in the world, will be brought back to life with investment from Chinese developers. Shanghai-based Zhongrong Group plans to invest 500 million pounds (US$ ) to build a replica of the iron and glass building as a cultural attraction in south London. The Crystal Palace, designed by Joseph Paxton for the 1851 Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, was the worlds biggest glass structure before it was destroyed by fire in 1936. The plans, announced Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 will replicate the buildings Victorian design in the original size and scale. (AP Photo/File)The Associated Press In this computer generated image provided by In-Press Photography, showing Shanghai-based Zhongrong Group’s proposed design on rebuilding Crystal Palace on the site of the original Victorian building in south-east London. Britains Crystal Palace, the Victorian exhibition center that was once the largest glass structure in the world, will be brought back to life with investment from Chinese developers. Shanghai-based Zhongrong Group plans to invest 500 million pounds (US$ ) to build a replica of the iron and glass building as a cultural attraction in south London. The Crystal Palace, designed by Joseph Paxton for the 1851 Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, was the worlds biggest glass structure before it was destroyed by fire in 1936. The plans, announced Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 will replicate the buildings Victorian design in the original size and scale. (AP Photo/In-Press Photography)The Associated Press